Camaradas

Cat Miller and Rafael Morales will collaborate on a pamphlet of poems featuring translations in different languages. The pamphlet will feature a poem written by Cat Miller, entitled: ‘Holiness of the Heart’ which was inspired by a quote by John Keats, who famously stated: ‘I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the Heart’s affections and the truth of Imagination’, in a letter to his best friend Bailey.

Holiness of the Heart was originally written in 2009 after seeing the film ‘Bright Star’ (2009), directed by Jane Campion. The poem was translated into French in 2013, further translated into Spanish in 2015 and more recently translated into Italian in December 2018 and January 2019. Leonardo Axuni will also translate the poem into P’urhépecha, an indigenous dialect from Michoacan, Mexico.

Language is pivotal in the areas of human rights protection, good governance, peace building, reconciliation, and sustainable development. 2019 is celebrated by UNESCO as the International Year of Indigenous Language:

‘It is through language that we communicate with the world, define our identity, express our history and culture, learn, defend our human rights and participate in all aspects of society, to name but a few.

Through language, people preserve their community’s history, customs and traditions, memory, unique modes of thinking, meaning and expression. They also use it to construct their future.’

The pamphlet will be accompanied by an an A1 Concrete Poetry Diptych, designed and directed by Cat Miller inspired by one of her all time favourite quotes by Luciano De Crescenzo: “We are each of us angels with only one wing, and we can only fly by embracing one another”. The piece will feature a pair of Angel Wings made from printed newsprint paper feathers, featuring the Holiness of the Heart poem in black and white for the English translation on one wing, and in red and white for the Spanish translation on the other wing; symbolising the UK – Mexican coming together for the Camaradas collaboration. View the piece insitu HERE:

This publication will be launched and presented at three special events in the UK from March onwards, celebrating 2019 as the International Year of Indigenous Language by UNESCO.

•  ‘Camaradas Art Competition UK – Mexico’ in London organized by the Mexican Embassy in the UK,

• ‘Bookmarks’ in Edinburgh organized by Edinburgh College of Art,

• ‘BABE’ in Bristol organized by University of the West of England.

READ THE HOLINESS OF THE HEART POEM HERE:
Holiness of the Heart – French / Spanish / Italian Translations

 

Rubber Sole

GoldenAngel

Can one darn the immortal hole

In the sock of experience that chafes the rubber-worn sole

Of the shoe that doesn’t fit

That doth tread the path of uncertainty and risk

Can one re-weave the flimsy fabric

Of a threadbare soul

That doth ponder at the point

Of a heartless commercial world

Can one repair a forlorn and forgotten heart

So ragged and frayed and falling apart

From trying so hard

To love lost and damaged souls

Earth-bound angels

Whom hath but only one wing

To save them from the danger of their self-seduced egos

So ready, eager and willing

To sacrifice themselves and die

In pursuit of a fake western dream

To live a synthetic lie

Indelibly imprinted upon the lids of ones minds-eye

Entombed by in-built expiry

Diamond Heart

Angels fall

And phoenix rise

Wings ruffle

Like a thousand beating hearts in the sky

Frosted with tiny diamond sparkles

Formed under the pressure

Of unrequited love

Held together with safety pins

And string…

Top 50 finalist for ‘Smile for London 2010’, 20 second silent film competition featuring a poem called ‘Diamond Heart’, written in 2001, images shot in Jan 2009.

Some nerdy facts about diamonds:
The word ‘Diamond‘ originated from the Greek word ‘adamas’, meaning ‘unconquerable’ and is a mineral made of more than 99.5% pure carbon atoms fused together by great pressure and heat that is crystallised. Diamonds are extremely durable and strong, they are in fact the hardest known substance in the world and can be used to cut anything. A diamond crystallises roughly 100 miles below the earths surface. The crystallisation occurs so low due to the temperatures and pressure required for the process to occur. They are found in the blue ground of the kimberlite pipes or in gravel beds and ocean floors. The way diamonds were brought to the surface of the earth and hence found were due to volcanic eruptions occurring over 60 million years ago pushed up through kimberlite pipes where they cooled. The deepest diamond is roughly 3400 feet below the ground, therefore a lot of rock and gravel need to be removed before even just one carat of diamond can be accessed. In order to do this jet engines are used to thaw the frozen ground or the opposite to bear the desert heat. From all the rough diamonds found through this process only approximately 20% are cut and polished while the remaining diamonds are used for industrial purposes. Diamonds  undergo many stages until they are presentable for purchase but only in the hands of a master diamond cutter does a diamond’s sheer beauty become apparent. Contrary to what many people believe, most diamonds do not form from coal: http://geology.com/articles/diamonds-from-coal/ Diamonds have become symbolic of enduring love due to their indestructibility and sparkling life.